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Thursday, March 12
 

9:00am

Race & Arts & Politics

PANEL: “Race & Arts & Politics”
Location: UC Theater

Krystal Languell "On the Structure of Belladonna Collaborative: Collaboration and negotiation of the editorial process via non-hierarchical, author-centered, anti-capitalist, anti-racist practices"
Kirsten Ortega: “What Audre Lorde’s Body Teaches Us: Imagining New Pedagogies of Race and Poetry”
John Hyland: “Sonic Performances of Radical Blackness”


Speakers
avatar for John Hyland

John Hyland

Postdoctoral Fellow, Haverford College
avatar for Krystal Languell

Krystal Languell

Krystal Languell was born in South Bend, Indiana. She is the author of the books Call the Catastrophists (BlazeVox, 2011) and Gray Market (Coconut, 2015) and the chapbooks Last Song (dancing girl press, 2014), and Be a Dead Girl (Argos Books, 2014). In early 2014, Fashion Blast Quarter... Read More →
KO

Kirsten Ortega

Kirsten Bartholomew Ortega is assistant professor of English at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. She teaches contemporary poetry studies, African American Literature, and twentieth-century American literature. She has published articles and book chapters about poetry... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC Theatre UC

9:00am

Territory, Racialized Erotic Tourism, and the Deeply Wounded

Michel Valentin: “Hybridity/Territoriality/De-Territorialization: Zones and Fluxes in Orson Welles's Touch of Evil”

Alicia Mountain: "Queer Mooring and Un-Mooring: Racialized Erotic Tourism in Woolf’s Orlando"

Rachel Mindell:  "Cutting Ties: The Deeply Wounded in Michelle Cliff's No Telephone to Heaven."


Moderators
avatar for Alicia Mountain

Alicia Mountain

Alicia Mountain received her MFA at the University of Montana in Missoula. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in Pleiades, Barrow Street, Witness, Spillway, LIT, The Southampton Review and elsewhere. She is the recent recipient of an Idyllwild Fellowship and received a... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alicia Mountain

Alicia Mountain

Alicia Mountain received her MFA at the University of Montana in Missoula. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in Pleiades, Barrow Street, Witness, Spillway, LIT, The Southampton Review and elsewhere. She is the recent recipient of an Idyllwild Fellowship and received a... Read More →
avatar for Michel Valentin

Michel Valentin

Professor of French, University of Montana
Everything as long as it is intelligent, baroque or postmodern, erotic, cosmic, different, unusual... or post-apocalyptic.


Thursday March 12, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC 331

9:00am

Reading, Stories, and Projects

Panel on writing about race, identity, and exploratory ideas. 

Anna Caroline Harris
: “Light, Bright, and Damn (-Near) White: A Poetry Reading and Conversation on Authority and Authenticity”

Joyce Maxwell: "Shoelace" Reading/movement presentation

Charlene Choi: "Writing and the Pursuit of the Unnameable Core"

Leisa Greene Nelson: Personal Essay 

Kendra Potter: Personal Essay


Moderators
avatar for Leisa Greene Nelson

Leisa Greene Nelson

English Department, Administrative Associate of Graduate Admissions, University of Montana
Because of my children, I write. EARLY OUT is about my awakening outside of the Mormon faith while my two sons, Dustin and Michael, were coming-of-age. Self-destruction nearly consumed me before I could shed suffocating lies, find my own truth, walk with integrity, and freely defend... Read More →

Speakers
CC

Charlene Choi

Charlene Charlene Choi is a Canadian writer, selected by the National Arts Club and the Page Series as one of New York City’s Best Emerging Writers.  She has studied Poetry at the University of Iowa’s Writers Workshop Graduate Summer Program and Fiction at the New School’s... Read More →
avatar for Joyce Maxwell

Joyce Maxwell

Professor of English, TC Columbia Univ/UCC
Joyce is a performance poet and writer. She has been teaching English and Creative Writing at Union County College for 15 years and is pursuing a doctorate in English Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. She is currently working on a performance piece titled "Shoelace... Read More →
avatar for Leisa Greene Nelson

Leisa Greene Nelson

English Department, Administrative Associate of Graduate Admissions, University of Montana
Because of my children, I write. EARLY OUT is about my awakening outside of the Mormon faith while my two sons, Dustin and Michael, were coming-of-age. Self-destruction nearly consumed me before I could shed suffocating lies, find my own truth, walk with integrity, and freely defend... Read More →
avatar for Kendra Potter

Kendra Potter

co founder, MT+NYC Collaborative
Kendra Mylnechuk (Lummi) is an actor, theatre artist, teaching artist, director and producer. She currently lives in Missoula, MT. Her film performances have screened at Sundance, Tribeca, SXSW, and other festivals around the world. Best actor in NBC/Universal Pictures Short Cuts... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC 330

9:00am

The Articulation of Disenfranchized Grief

What happens when you articulate disenfranchised grief? What is lost and born? How do you perform an exorcism on yourself through writing? Movement, shake medicine: "I want to dance the shame from my body." How do you write an origin story when there isn't one? What if the origin has been erased? There is no path back, yet you search anyway and end up discovering ancestral roots, the drumming heard deep in the rainforest: "In the jungle there is a foreboding that surrounds a sentence." The ancestral line loops back not to the beginning of one's life nor just before, but rather to the primordial. Orality. But what if you have been stripped from language? What happens when language fails to encapsulate lived experience? What happens when all you have left is "the body to articulate loss" (Sarita Echavez See)? Subversive assimilation? Interested in cross cultural (re)connections, what begins as a suturing of bodies, as an exploration of liminal identities, language and citizenship, becomes something performative. Whether on the page or through movement and multimedia, all the participants work at the intersections of writing and performance art.

Recently, at Naropa University, Claudia Rankine said that “shame is a condition of dignity.” I think that quote speaks to microaggressions, which lead to disenfranchised grief. That idea that we can’t speak or that if we do, we’ll be harassed. We feel ashamed for not speaking, but also for speaking. We also feel ashamed when we have the chance to speak and find we have no words. So how do we as writers and artists create the space to explore it?


Moderators
avatar for Amanda Ngoho Reavey

Amanda Ngoho Reavey

Woodland Pattern Book Center
Amanda Ngoho Reavey received an MFA in Writing & Poetics from the Jack Kerouac School at Naropa University and is currently the Marketing Director at Woodland Pattern. Her first book, Marilyn, was published by The Operating System in 2015.

Speakers
avatar for April Joseph

April Joseph

Writer/ Writing Instructor
April is a poet from East L.A., California, who is currently exploring the PNW. After studying The Beat Generation and Buddhism in American Popular Culture at the University of California, San Diego, s)he received a MFA in Writing and Poetics from the Jack Kerouac School at Naropa... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Ngoho Reavey

Amanda Ngoho Reavey

Woodland Pattern Book Center
Amanda Ngoho Reavey received an MFA in Writing & Poetics from the Jack Kerouac School at Naropa University and is currently the Marketing Director at Woodland Pattern. Her first book, Marilyn, was published by The Operating System in 2015.
avatar for Aja Mujinga Sherrard

Aja Mujinga Sherrard

Assistant Professor, University of Montana Western
Incorporating my continuing research into contemporary cultural studies, my practice is conceptually driven and media-flexible. Through the use of installations, interventions, photography, film, paintings, and performance, I seek to articulate stories of migration, self-translation... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC 332

11:00am

A Discussion of Visual Art, Text, and Culture

Mary Ann Bonjorni, Moderator

Heejoo Gwen Kim 

Rochelle Kulei

Lisa Jarrett

 

 


Moderators
avatar for Mary Ann Bonjorni

Mary Ann Bonjorni

Originally from the Pacific Northwest, Mary Ann migrated to the interior West in search of family roots and to research Western U.S. history. As an artist, she presents found and manufactured icons to suggest socio-political narratives. When not in the studio or teaching at The... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Jarrett

Lisa Jarrett

Assistant Professor of Community and Context Arts, Portland State University
Lisa Jarrett was born in 1977 in Morristown, New Jersey. Growing up as a Black American who moved with her family to various, often conflicting political climates in cities in Texas, Minnesota, and New York, the influences of her upbringing in a post-Civil Rights and increasingly... Read More →
avatar for Heejoo Gwen Kim

Heejoo Gwen Kim

Assistant Professor, University of Montana
Heejoo Gwen Kim is an experimental filmmaker and new media artist. Her films have been internationally presented at the festivals. Currently she is teaching at The University of Montana. She was used to teach School of Art Institute of Chicago in Art and Technology Studies Dept. and... Read More →
RK

Rochelle Kulei

http://rochellekulei.com/home.html


Thursday March 12, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
UC 332

11:00am

Fence Talk & Reading: A Conversation between Ed Pavlic and John Keene
Moderators
avatar for John Keene

John Keene

Associate Professor, Rutgers University at Newark
John Keene is the author of the poetic novel Annotations (New Directions, 1995); of the poetry collection Seismosis (1913 Press), with artist Christopher Stackhouse; and of the short fiction collection Counternarratives (New Directions, 2015) . He also is the translator of Brazilian... Read More →

Speakers
EP

Ed Pavlic

Professor of English and Creative Writing, ED PAVLIĆ’S newest books are Let's Let | That Are Not Yet : Inferno (National Poetry Series, Fence Books, 2015), Visiting Hours at the  | Color Line (National Poetry Series, Milkweed Editions, 2013), But Here Are Small Clear  | Refractions... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
Shakespeare & Co.

11:00am

Infiltrate What Exists, Innovate What Doesn’t: The Transborder Immigrant Tool, Queer Intermedia, Technoshamanism & Rogue Counting

Ricardo Dominguez

Lucas de Lima: "Technoshamanism" 

Gregory Laynor: "'Another Kind of Love': Queer Intermedia and Race"

Eunsong Kim 


Moderators
avatar for Eunsong Kim

Eunsong Kim

Eunsong Kim is a graduate student at the University of California, San Diego. Kim actively works with local and national youth arts organizations Urban Gateways and Young Audiences of San Diego, to develop critically based art programs. Kim’s poetry and writing on contemporary culture... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ricardo Dominquez

Ricardo Dominquez

Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab, Ricardo Dominguez
Ricardo Dominguez is a co-founder of The Electronic Disturbance Theater (EDT), a group who developed virtual sit-in technologies in solidarity with the Zapatistas communities in Chiapas, Mexico, in 1998. His recent Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab project ( http://bang.transreal.org... Read More →
avatar for Eunsong Kim

Eunsong Kim

Eunsong Kim is a graduate student at the University of California, San Diego. Kim actively works with local and national youth arts organizations Urban Gateways and Young Audiences of San Diego, to develop critically based art programs. Kim’s poetry and writing on contemporary culture... Read More →
avatar for Gregory Laynor

Gregory Laynor

Gregory Laynor is writing a dissertation at the University of Washington Seattle called The Making of Intermedia: 1952 to 1972, John Cage to Yoko Ono & teaching courses in art history, poetics, and performance studies at the University of Washington Bothell. Gregory Laynor’s work... Read More →
avatar for Lucas de Lima

Lucas de Lima

PhD student, University of Pennsylvania


Thursday March 12, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
UC Theatre UC

11:00am

Reading and Conversation

Poets Ailish Hopper, Blas Falconer, Metta Sáma and Orlando White will read selections from their work and will offer comprehensive advice on how to approach their work (and other work that speaks directly to race, ethnicity, nation, tribe, sexuality, class) in the classroom. This will be, primarily, an interactive conversation amongst practitioners of charged innovative writing who are professors interested in multi-disciplinary approaches to teaching. 

 


Moderators
avatar for Ailish Hopper

Ailish Hopper

I'm the author of Dark~Sky Society (New Issues, 2014), and the chapbook, Bird in the Head (Center for Book Arts, 2005). The narrative I'm presenting at TIP in 2017 is from a book of essays (some drawings, some documentation of collaborations in Baltimore), "Vanish into Form," that... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Blas Falconer

Blas Falconer

Murray State University
avatar for Ailish Hopper

Ailish Hopper

I'm the author of Dark~Sky Society (New Issues, 2014), and the chapbook, Bird in the Head (Center for Book Arts, 2005). The narrative I'm presenting at TIP in 2017 is from a book of essays (some drawings, some documentation of collaborations in Baltimore), "Vanish into Form," that... Read More →
avatar for Metta Sáma

Metta Sáma

I live in North Carolina & originally am from Tennessee. I have mostly lived in the Midwest & Northeast for the past 15 years; this return to the South is mind-boggling, particularly talking about race & history in the South that would like to forget its history (in theory) but do... Read More →
avatar for Orlando White

Orlando White

English Faculty, Diné College
Poet Orlando White is from Tółikan, Arizona. He is Diné of the Naaneesht’ézhi Tábaahí and born for the Naakai Diné’e. White is the author of two books of poetry, Bone Light (Red Hen Press), which Kazim Ali described as a “careful excavation on language and letters and... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
UC 331

11:00am

Who's Hump? — Performing Racial Imaginaries

Who’s Hump? : Comics-Poetics  and the Racial Imaginary

A collaborative multi-media comix-poetry event  featuring a reading from Vidhu Aggarwal’s poetry script The Trouble with Humpadori with audio-visual components from Bishakh Som’s graphic illustrations of the work.  Discussion about Hindu gods, comics, animation, collaboration, gender, and minstrelsy.  ​



Moderators
avatar for Vidhu Aggarwal

Vidhu Aggarwal

Associate Professor, Rollins College
Born in Ranchi, India, Vidhu Aggarwal grew up in the Southern U.S., primarily in Louisiana and Texas. Her multi-media works in video, poetry, and scholarship are oriented around Bollywood spectacle, carnival, and science fiction. Her poems appeared in the top 25 of 2016 in Boston... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Vidhu Aggarwal

Vidhu Aggarwal

Associate Professor, Rollins College
Born in Ranchi, India, Vidhu Aggarwal grew up in the Southern U.S., primarily in Louisiana and Texas. Her multi-media works in video, poetry, and scholarship are oriented around Bollywood spectacle, carnival, and science fiction. Her poems appeared in the top 25 of 2016 in Boston... Read More →
avatar for Bishakh Som

Bishakh Som

Bishakh Som's work investigates the intersection between image and text, figure and architecture, architecture and landscape. Inspired by the grammar of comics and graphic novels, they seek to expand the vocabulary of the narratives traditionally presented in this medium by exploring... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
UC 330

1:00pm

Lorna Lowe Premiere: Romeo
Come to the Northwest premiere for Romeo!

ROMEO follows domestic violence counselor Antonio Arrendel's personal and professional challenge to rehabilitate batterers in Boston. 

Moderators
avatar for Lorna Lowe

Lorna Lowe

Producer, Lorna Lowe|Documentary Films, Inc.


Thursday March 12, 2015 1:00pm - 2:30pm
UC Theatre UC

3:45pm

Founders Reading and Talk

John Keene

Tisa Byrant

Sherwin Bitsui

Dorothy Wang


Moderators
avatar for Dorothy Wang

Dorothy Wang

Associate Professor, Williams College
Dorothy Wang's  monograph Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2013) received the Association for Asian American Studies' award for best book of literary criticism in 2016 and made The New Yorker's list... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sherwin Bitsui

Sherwin Bitsui

Sherwin Bitsui is the author of Flood Song (Copper Canyon Press) and Shapeshift (University of Arizona Press). He Diné is of the Bįį’bítóó’nii’ Tódi’chii’nii clan and is born for the Tlizilłani’ clan. He is from White Cone, Arizona on the Navajo Reservation. His... Read More →
avatar for Tisa Bryant

Tisa Bryant

Director, MFA Creative Writing Program, Co-Director, Equity & Diversity, California Institute of the Arts
Tisa Bryant makes work that often traverses the boundaries of genre, culture and history, with an enduring fascination with fusing critical and creative writing through the other arts into distinctive registers and new forms. She is the author of Unexplained Presence, a collection... Read More →
avatar for John Keene

John Keene

Associate Professor, Rutgers University at Newark
John Keene is the author of the poetic novel Annotations (New Directions, 1995); of the poetry collection Seismosis (1913 Press), with artist Christopher Stackhouse; and of the short fiction collection Counternarratives (New Directions, 2015) . He also is the translator of Brazilian... Read More →
avatar for Dorothy Wang

Dorothy Wang

Associate Professor, Williams College
Dorothy Wang's  monograph Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2013) received the Association for Asian American Studies' award for best book of literary criticism in 2016 and made The New Yorker's list... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
UC Theatre UC

3:45pm

Thinking/Writing/Reading Race: Responses from the Creative Writing Program at the University of Georgia

The various intellectual interests of the faculty at UGA, which include Native American
Studies, Jazz, the work of James Baldwin, and Early American Literature, have made it 
possible to foster serious conversations about race and aesthetics within the Creative Writing  Doctoral Program. This panel will showcase the program’s breadth of disciplinary and aesthetic approaches. 

PRESENTERS:
1) LeAnne Howe: “Race and American Indians: A reading.” 
Abstract: LeAnne Howe will read from Choctalking on Other Realities, one part tragedy, one 
part absurdist fiction, one part marvelous realism, a tribalography on race: "Today, Arabs in 
keffiyehs have replace images of Plains Indians fighting the US Cavalry. The fact that Arabs 
identify with Indians and not John Wayne isn't surprising.  We've both been enemies of the 
United States."   


Bio: LeAnne Howe (Choctaw) writes fiction, poetry, plays and scholarship that deal with 
Native experiences.  She’s received American Book Award, Tulsa Library Literary Award, a 
2012 USA Artist Ford Fellowship, and Fulbright Scholarship, among others.  She’s the 
Eidson Distinguished Professor at the University of Georgia, Athens.  


2) Ed Pavlic: A Poetry Reading 
Abstract: Pavlic will read work from his newest book, Let's Let That Are Not Yet : Inferno 
(National Poetry Series, Fence Books, 2015 – Judge, John Keene). 

Bio: Professor of English and Creative Writing, ED PAVLIĆ’S newest books are Let's Let 
That Are Not Yet : Inferno (National Poetry Series, Fence Books, 2015), Visiting Hours at the 
Color Line (National Poetry Series, Milkweed Editions, 2013), But Here Are Small Clear 
Refractions (Achebe Center, 2009, Kwani? Trust, 2013) and Winners Have Yet to be Announced: A Song for Donny Hathaway (U Georgia P, 2008). Others works include Paraph of Bone & Other Kinds of Blue (Copper Canyon, 2001), Crossroads Modernism: Descent and Emergence in African American Literary Culture (U Minnesota Press, 2002), and Labors Lost Left Unfinished (UPNE/Sheep Meadow Press, 2006).

Among his current projects are two book-length manuscripts concerning the life and work 
of James Baldwin: “‘Who Can Afford to Improvise?’: Black Music and James Baldwin’s 
Political Aesthetic,” and “No Time to Rest: James Baldwin’s Life in Letters to His Brother 
David.”

3) Magdalena Zurawski, Cultivating Territory: Imaginary and Real Removal in Margaret 
Fuller’s Summer on the Lakes 

Abstract: In this talk I consider Summer on the Lakes, Margaret Fuller’s travel narrative from 
1843, as an example of literary cultivation in the service of American expansionism. Placing 
Fuller within the context of the British aesthetic tradition of the picturesque, I read her 
extensive citations of Wordsworth within her travel narrative as a transformation and 
continuation of the English eighteenth-century aesthetic practice, which enabled a rising 
middle-class to “possess” English land through the development of literary and painterly 
sensibilities. Fuller’s adoption of the picturesque, I show, enables her own literary cultivation 
to mediate an imaginary and subjective possession of formerly Indian land and thus serves as a psychological means of expanding real national territory. I argue that Fuller’s extension of European literary tradition into an American sphere as expressed through the excessive 
literary citations within the text aestheticizes her encounters with native Americans and 
permits her to imagine her encounters as an expansion of poetic tradition rather than as a 
hostile political act. Fuller’s dependence upon Wordsworth’s poetry and German literary 
sources in order to mediate her quasi-colonial position in formerly native territories presents 
a compelling example of intellectual cultivation in service of New World expansionism.

Bio: Magdalena Zurawski joined UGA's English faculty in the Fall of 2013. Her novel The 
Bruise was published in 2008 by FC2/University of Alabama Press. It received both a 2008 
Lambda Award and the 2007 Ronald Sukenick-American Book Review Innovative Fiction 
Prize. She holds a BA in Comparative Literature from Brown University and completed her 
PhD in American Literature at Duke University in 2013. Litmus Press will be publishing her 
poetry collection Companion Animal in the Fall of 2014.

4) Shamala Gallagher, reading form Mooncalf, a fabulist non-fiction essay

Abstract: I will read from my nonfiction manuscript Mooncalf, a lyric address to Caliban that 
shifts among creative and critical genres in its search for an understanding of "otherness." 

Bio: Shamala Gallagher's poetry has appeared in VOLT, Verse Daily, Copper Nickel, 
Timber, The Offending Adam, Word For/Word, Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United 
States, and elsewhere. Her chapbook I Learned the Language of Barbs and Sparks No One Spoke is forthcoming from dancing girl press in 2015. She received her BA from Stanford University and her MFA from the Michener Center for Writers at UT-Austin, and she is currently a first-year PhD student at the University of Georgia. 

5) Gabrielle Fuentes, reading from Settler’s Point

Abstract: My novel in progress, "Settler's Point," examines the insidious divisions of race and class on a religious commune in rural Northern Wisconsin during the Great Depression. Set against the backdrop of the Dust Bowl, Prohibition, and rising KKK violence, "Settler's 
Point" explores a community seemingly living outside of racial boundaries and yet founded 
on segregation and racial violence. 

Bio: Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes is from Madison, Wisconsin. Her work has appeared or is 
forthcoming in One Story, Western Humanities Review, Pank, The Collagist, Tweed’s, 
NANO Fiction, The Yoke, SpringGun, and elsewhere. She received her BA from Brown 
University and her MFA from the University of Colorado, Boulder. She is currently a PhD 
candidate in the Creative Writing Program at UGA.


Moderators
avatar for Magdalena Zurawski

Magdalena Zurawski

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia, Athens
Magdalena Zurawski is the author of The Bruise (a novel) and Companion Animal (a poetry collection). In the spring of 2019 Wave Books will published her newest poetry collection The Tiniest Muzzle Sings Songs of Freedom. Currently she is working on a book-length essay on teaching... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes

Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes

Author, THE SLEEPING WORLD
Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes is the author of The Sleeping World (Touchstone, 2016). She has received fellowships from Yaddo, the Millay Colony, Willapa Bay AiR, and the Blue Mountain Center. Her work has appeared in One Story, Cosmonauts Avenue, Slice, Pank, and elsewhere. Her story... Read More →
avatar for Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher is a PhD candidate and instructor in English, Creative Writing, and Women's Studies at the University of Georgia. Recent poems and essays appear in Poetry, Black Warrior Review, The Rumpus, and The Offing.
avatar for LeAnne Howe

LeAnne Howe

Eidson Distinguished Professor, University of Georgia
LeAnne Howe is the author of novels, plays, poetry, screenplays, and scholarship that deal with Native experiences. An enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, her first novel Shell Shaker, received an American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation 2002; Evidence... Read More →
EP

Ed Pavlic

Professor of English and Creative Writing, ED PAVLIĆ’S newest books are Let's Let | That Are Not Yet : Inferno (National Poetry Series, Fence Books, 2015), Visiting Hours at the  | Color Line (National Poetry Series, Milkweed Editions, 2013), But Here Are Small Clear  | Refractions... Read More →
avatar for Magdalena Zurawski

Magdalena Zurawski

Assistant Professor, University of Georgia, Athens
Magdalena Zurawski is the author of The Bruise (a novel) and Companion Animal (a poetry collection). In the spring of 2019 Wave Books will published her newest poetry collection The Tiniest Muzzle Sings Songs of Freedom. Currently she is working on a book-length essay on teaching... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
UC 330

7:15pm

Conference Introduction: Prageeta Sharma, Joanna Klink, Dorothy Wang; remarks by Tami Haaland
Speakers
avatar for Tami Haaland

Tami Haaland

Montana State University Billings
Tami Haaland is the author of three poetry collections, What Does Not Return (Lost Horse Press, 2017), When We Wake in the Night, and A Breath in Every Room, winner of the Nicholas Roerich First Book Award. She earned a MFA in Creative Writing and Literature from Bennington College... Read More →
avatar for Joanna Klink

Joanna Klink

Joanna Klink is the author of four books of poetry: They Are Sleeping, Circadian, Raptus, and Excerpts from a Secret Prophecy (Penguin, 2015). She has received awards and fellowships from the Rona Jaffe Foundation, Jeannette Haien Ballard, Civitella Ranieri, and The American Academy... Read More →
avatar for Prageeta Sharma

Prageeta Sharma

Professor, The University of Montana
Prageeta Sharma is the author of four poetry collections, Bliss to Fill, The Opening Question, Infamous Landscapes, and Undergloom. Her writing has appeared in journals and anthologies such as Boston Review, Agni, Fence, The Women's Review of Books and (among others) The Harper Collins... Read More →
avatar for Dorothy Wang

Dorothy Wang

Associate Professor, Williams College
Dorothy Wang's  monograph Thinking Its Presence: Form, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2013) received the Association for Asian American Studies' award for best book of literary criticism in 2016 and made The New Yorker's list... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2015 7:15pm - 7:30pm
UC Theatre UC

8:00pm

Native American Paranormal Society (NAPS): Play by William S. YellowRobe

Native American Paranormal Society (NAPS) is a view into the present paranormal craze.  Ghosts and Spirits have existed in Euro-American literature since Greek comedies to Shakespeare.  Spirituality is a strong theme in some Native American literature as well.  YellowRobe takes a look as to when those who are at rest and who are at peace are disturbed by the arrogance of the living.  Set in an abandoned Bingo Hall/Casino, the current residents are those who have lost their lives within the Bingo Hall/ Casino.  This is a long one-act play.

There will be no intermission.


Moderators
avatar for Margo Lukens

Margo Lukens

Professor, University of Maine
Intertribal drama, decolonization, teaching about white privilege, acting, directing, community theater, Gilbert & Sullivan, and Innovation Engineering!

Speakers
avatar for Kendra Potter

Kendra Potter

co founder, MT+NYC Collaborative
Kendra Mylnechuk (Lummi) is an actor, theatre artist, teaching artist, director and producer. She currently lives in Missoula, MT. Her film performances have screened at Sundance, Tribeca, SXSW, and other festivals around the world. Best actor in NBC/Universal Pictures Short Cuts... Read More →
avatar for William S. YellowRobe

William S. YellowRobe

"'You are a good actor, but we have no Indian roles,' is what I heard as an actor in school. I started writing plays and I heard, 'It is a good play but we can’t do it because we have no Indian actors,'" said William S. Yellow Robe, Jr. of his life in American theater. William... Read More →


Thursday March 12, 2015 8:00pm - 9:15pm
UC Theatre UC

9:45pm

Reception
Join us for sweets & savories. Drinks available at a cash bar. 

Thursday March 12, 2015 9:45pm - 11:00pm
UC Gallery and Lounge
 
Friday, March 13
 

9:00am

On William S. YellowRobe: Understanding Native Tribal Identity through Native Drama: A Panel Discussion of the Plays of Assiniboine Playwright William S. YellowRobe

Understanding Native Tribal Identity through Native Drama:  A panel discussion of the plays of  Assiniboine playwright, William S. YellowRobe

Chair:  David L. Moore, University of Montana

Katie Kane, University of Montana:  “Better-n-Indians: A Reading” [title to be revised]

Margo Lukens, University of Maine:   “Art That Works: William YellowRobe’s Star Quilter as Open Letter”

George Price, University of Montana:  “Afrophobia in Native American History: Reflections on William S. YellowRobe's Grandchildren of the Buffalo Soldiers” 

Respondent:  William S. YellowRobe

 

Abstracts: 

1)    David L. Moore, as chair, will briefly offer a context for the panel and introduce the panelists. 

2)    Katie Kane, University of Montana

“Better-n-Indians: A Reading” [title to be revised]

Katie Kane, professor of English at the University of Montana, will read William S. YellowRobe’s formally innovative and thematically anti-colonial play, “Better-n-Indians,” drawing on interviews she did with Mr. YellowRobe during the late stages of production of the play.  In addition, Mr. YellowRobe’s relationship of affiliation and distance from the plays of Luis Valdez and dramaturgy of Oskar Eustas will be explored. 

3)    Margo Lukens, University of Maine

“Art That Works: William YellowRobe’s Star Quilter as Open Letter”

In the context of Claudia Rankine’s calling out of unexamined racism in contemporary American art, and of art’s failure to make us confront and think creatively in response to racism, the importance of reading plays by William Yellow Robe is undeniable.

In “The Star Quilter” William YellowRobe examines racism with the absolute clarity that his audience might include anyone—from Assiniboine people to Native Americans and African Americans to white Anglo protestant people like myself—and everyone in between.  No surprise there—like Rankine, YellowRobe lives the experience of an American of color, where one is responsible for being aware of many perspectives outside one’s own.

YellowRobe’s play depicts four private encounters between Mona Gray, a traditional Assiniboine star quilter modeled on YellowRobe’s mother, Mina Rose Forest YellowRobe, and Luanne Jorgensen, a wealthy and politically “well-connected” Montana rancher’s wife.   YellowRobe’s work of art, aimed at public performance, makes public a private exchange mirroring so many private exchanges that have taken place between white and Native American people—in a way that shows the intricacy of racist behavior and self justification, and illuminates for his audience the complexity of possible responses to unexamined racist behavior.  YellowRobe’s depiction gives all the participants (readers, actors, audience members) a chance to walk a while in someone else’s shoes, and to try on attitudes in a safe way.  This immersion in a moment of art (a poem, a song, a scene from a play or story) is different from taking the stance of academic argument that too often aligns with one’s most rigid preconceived notions.  Even reading aloud—giving breath to words from the page and hearing how they sound coming from one’s own mouth—is a way of trying on the pain or fear or courage or questioning of another person’s experience. 

I will argue (from experience) that the Assiniboine aesthetic informing YellowRobe’s work provides a model for the work art could be doing, and an exemplum of the change we all need to learn to make.

4)    George Price, University of Montana

“Afrophobia in Native American History: Reflections on William S. YellowRobe Grandchildren of the Buffalo Soldiers

The popular concept of “race theory,” as a way of explaining human diversity, was unknown among indigenous peoples of the Americas before European colonialism in the Western Hemisphere. Shortly after the U.S. confiscation of Native American lands west of the Mississippi River, the creation of the reservation system, and the arrival of millions of racist Euro-Americans to live in close proximity to, and some cases actually on, the Indian Reservations, Afrophobia and other racial concepts began to filter into Native American social discourse and experience. William YellowRobe’s play, Grandchildren of the Buffalo Soldiers, sheds much light upon this historic occurrence as it played out in one Northern Plains tribe in the 20th century, along with its aftereffects and ongoing challenges. I plan to comment on this history and how it is illuminated in this play, along with the consequences and current issues related to it. One question that I hope to explore is how and why did the Buffalo Soldiers come to represent all African Americans in the minds of many Native people of Northern Plains tribes, and how much of that perception was based on their actual interactions with African Americans, as opposed to hearsay and general allegations? 

5)    William S. YellowRobe as respondent, will comment on the papers, the plays, and the themes of the panel. 


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Katie Kane

Katie Kane

Associate Professor, University of Montana
Katie Kane is a professor of Cultural Studies, English Literature, and Colonial Studies at the University of Montana. The author of a study on the links between Ireland and Indian Country as they emerge out of a shard history of land appropriation and the use of reserved land, Kane... Read More →
avatar for Margo Lukens

Margo Lukens

Professor, University of Maine
Intertribal drama, decolonization, teaching about white privilege, acting, directing, community theater, Gilbert & Sullivan, and Innovation Engineering!
GP

George Price

Lecturer, University of Montana
Besides my official UM faculty website, http://www.cas.umt.edu/nas/faculty/staffInfo.cfm?ID=1071, where you can find the usual professional information, I have a new blog, Learning Earthways, at http://georgepriceblog.wordpress.com/, which better describes my current concerns, or... Read More →
avatar for William S. YellowRobe

William S. YellowRobe

"'You are a good actor, but we have no Indian roles,' is what I heard as an actor in school. I started writing plays and I heard, 'It is a good play but we can’t do it because we have no Indian actors,'" said William S. Yellow Robe, Jr. of his life in American theater. William... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC Theatre UC

9:00am

Pedagogy, Race, and Culture

Jimmy Kendall: Decentering White Authority: Teaching Ferguson as a Rhetorics of Inclusion

Joyce Maxwell: Raced Fear: Real and Imagined

Quan Ha: Imperialist Nostalgia in Andrew Lam's Vietnamese American short story 'Slingshot'

Casey Charles: Queer Intersections in Baldwin's Jimmy's Blues and Other Poems

Ari Laurel: Teaching Solidarity

 


Moderators
avatar for Quan-Manh Ha

Quan-Manh Ha

Assistant Prof. of English, Univ. of Montana
Quan Manh Ha, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Montana. His research interests primarily focus on 20th-century and contemporary American literature, Vietnam War literature, ethnic studies, and literary translation. His publications have appeared in various... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Quan-Manh Ha

Quan-Manh Ha

Assistant Prof. of English, Univ. of Montana
Quan Manh Ha, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Montana. His research interests primarily focus on 20th-century and contemporary American literature, Vietnam War literature, ethnic studies, and literary translation. His publications have appeared in various... Read More →
avatar for Jimmy Kendall

Jimmy Kendall

Adjunct Lecturer, Interim Composition Coordinator, University of Montana
avatar for Ari Laurel

Ari Laurel

Tech Workers Coalition
avatar for Joyce Maxwell

Joyce Maxwell

Professor of English, TC Columbia Univ/UCC
Joyce is a performance poet and writer. She has been teaching English and Creative Writing at Union County College for 15 years and is pursuing a doctorate in English Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. She is currently working on a performance piece titled "Shoelace... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC 331

9:00am

Race, Reading, and the Institution

David Witzling: “Postmodern Prose and the Discourse of the “Cultural Jew”: The Cases of Mailer and Foer”

Janelle Adsit: "Finding the Other’s Voice: Race, Institution, and Will Alexander’s Poetics”

Jane Wong: “Continuing the 'MFA vs. POC' Conversation”

Sun Yung Shin "Guest & Host: Race Writing as a Cyborg in the Uncanny Valley of Transnational Adoption." 

Rachel Richardson: "
Examination of What: Music & Race in the Composition Classroom" 

Moderators
DW

David Witzling

Associate Professor, English, Manhattan College
I am Associate Professor of English at Manhattan College, where I teach American Literature, African-American literature, and literary theory. I am the author of Everybody’s America: Thomas Pynchon, Race, and the Cultures of Postmodernism (Routledge, 2008). My ongoing research project... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Richardson

Rachel Richardson

Rachel Richardson is a MFA candidate in poetry at the University of Montana.
avatar for Sun Yung Shin

Sun Yung Shin

BOOKS: | Author, books of poems | Unbearable Splendor (Coffee House Press, forthcoming) | Rough, and Savage (Coffee House Press) | Skirt Full of Black (Coffee House Press) | | Editor, anthologies of essays | A Peculiar Price: New Writing on Racial Realities in Minnesota... Read More →
DW

David Witzling

Associate Professor, English, Manhattan College
I am Associate Professor of English at Manhattan College, where I teach American Literature, African-American literature, and literary theory. I am the author of Everybody’s America: Thomas Pynchon, Race, and the Cultures of Postmodernism (Routledge, 2008). My ongoing research project... Read More →
avatar for Jane Wong

Jane Wong

The University of Washington
Jane Wong's poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Best American Poetry 2015, Hayden's Ferry Review, Tupelo Quarterly, The Volta, CutBank, The Arcadia Project: North American Postmodern Pastoral, and Best New Poets 2012. The recipient of fellowships from the U.S. Fulbright Program... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC 333

9:00am

Racializing Whiteness

This panel considers the way whiteness participates in the racial dynamics of contemporary American poetry. As Toni Morrison assures an interviewer, we are all "raced." But what does that mean for white writers who have written with whiteness as their background, white on white? Markers of whiteness are deeply embedded into the expectations that govern how a thing or a person should be composed, into notions of legibility. Where do white writers’ choices implicitly or explicitly reveal how the writers are raced? How do decisions about subject or process impact poets of color? Presenters will engage with specific aspects of what happens as the white subject position becomes racialized. Presenters will discuss the topic through close readings, interrogations of personal work, creative erasure, and socio-historical reviews. This includes notions of anger as held against people of color, anxiety around the term “racist” as an adjective versus a noun, and an exploration of white male poets dragging the dominant lyric into a mode of interiority at a time when minority voices were gaining authority from an expanding speaker position. 

STATEMENT OF MERIT

The full context of the Toni Morrison interview shows her responding to accusations of being preoccupied by race, and to “concerns” that she only writes about black subject matters. This highlights the problem of whiteness being somehow excluded from racial configurations, or, more to the point, the problem of race being recognized topically as an explicit social or political category and not by the micro-tendencies and residual effects of structuring (literary) perception on a white and euro-centric legacies. Beyond self-announcing efforts at incorporating race into a poetic project, how can race be made visible—through affective stances, tonal contours, procedural decisions? White poets have historically seemed unconcerned with race, though their indifference does not mean that their poetry does make statements about race. Where racial aspects of white have been discounted or under-investigated, this panel seeks to make interventions. 

 


Moderators
avatar for Diana Arterian

Diana Arterian

Doctoral Candidate, USC PhD in Lit & Creative Writing
Diana Arterian was born and raised in Arizona. She currently resides in Los Angeles where she is pursuing her PhD in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Southern California. She holds an MFA in poetry from CalArts, where she was a Beutner Fellow. | Diana is a... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Diana Arterian

Diana Arterian

Doctoral Candidate, USC PhD in Lit & Creative Writing
Diana Arterian was born and raised in Arizona. She currently resides in Los Angeles where she is pursuing her PhD in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Southern California. She holds an MFA in poetry from CalArts, where she was a Beutner Fellow. | Diana is a... Read More →
avatar for Todd Fredson

Todd Fredson

Todd Fredson is the author of the poetry collection, The Crucifix-Blocks (Tebot Bach, 2012), which won the 2011 Patricia Bibby First Book Award. His work has appeared in American Poetry Review, Blackbird, Gulf Coast, Interim, Poetry International, West Branch and other journals and... Read More →
avatar for Jen Hofer

Jen Hofer

Antena
Jen Hofer is a Los Angeles-based poet, translator, social justice interpreter, teacher, knitter, book-maker, public letter-writer, urban cyclist, and co-founder of the language justice and literary activism collaborative Antena. Her latest translations include the chapbook En las... Read More →
avatar for Farid Matuk

Farid Matuk

Assistant Professor, English and Creative Writing, University of Arizona
Farid Matuk is the author of This Isa Nice Neighborhood (Letter Machine, 2010) and My Daughter La Chola (Ahsahta, 2013). New poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in Poetry, Boundary2, Floor, and Best American Experimental Poetry 2014. The Headlands Center for the Arts... Read More →
avatar for Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith recently co-edited the anthology Angels of the Americplyse: New Latin@ Writing (Counterpath, 2014). Her most recent poetry collection, Milk and Filth was a finalist for the NBCC. A CantoMundo Fellow, she is the publisher of Noemi Press. Her newest collection... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC 332

9:00am

Where's Wanda: Writers of Color, the Unconscious Quota System, and Our Inadequate Imaginings

(Presentation will be from 9:00-9:30)

Presenter bio: Geneva Chao has recently proposed the torus (a surface of revolution in continual motion around its coplanar axis) as a metaphor for the Asian American writing community. This happened at the California Institute for Integral Studies’ Conference “From Trauma to Catharsis: Performing the Asian Avant-Garde” in August 2014 in San Francisco, where she also read from the creative work “A Comprehensive History of Asian Americans.” Her critical piece on Don Mee Choi’s translations of Kim Hyesoon’s poetry will appear from the Asian American Writers’ Workshop in November. Her poems and translations have appeared in various places, including New American Writing and The L.A. Telephone Book, vol. 2, and she teaches writing in Los Angeles. genevachao@gmail.com

Presentation/performance: Solo piece entitled “Where’s Wanda:  Writers of Color, the Unconcious Quota System, and Our Inadequate Imaginings.” Sesshu Foster’s recent blog post discussing the “Made in L.A.” art exhibit at UCLA’s Hammer Museum lamented that there were not more artists of color in that event and in the city in general, saying “so it’s okay, because “black los angeles” had its day/it had the one exhibit/it has black history month every year/it had wanda coleman (in those days).” At almost the same moment, NYC poet Jennifer Tamayo posted the following Facebook status update: “A DECISION'S BEEN MADE: if your NYC reading event has more than 2 people in it and all of them are white, i'm not going.” This creative talk/performance will explore the ways in which “checking the POC box” by including a small minority of POC writers and artists may make an event or community feel “integrated,” while both ghettoizing and pigeonholing the minority writer, who is then forced to be the token minority and to “represent” (through acquiescence to or rejection of) others’ racial imaginings. Wanda Coleman, beloved “unofficial poet laureate,” was an example of this -- her name was a mantra reassuring you that Los Angeles poetry was not all white -- the way the presence of a tiny minority of writers of color in a community serves to maintain their ghettoization. Through research, discussion of critical race theory, and imagined dialogues, this piece will both educate and enrage its audience.

Event statement of merit: Coleman once said that "Words seem inadequate in expressing the anger and outrage I feel at the persistent racism that permeates every aspect of black American life. Since words are what I am best at, I concern myself with this as an urban actuality as best I can." It is my project in this piece to synthesise some of the ways writers of color respond to the racial label that dogs them and to illustrate how through resistance, interrogation, and the wielding of words, we address the inadequacy of racial imagining, the constant burr of literariness being centered in whiteness, and the way in which participation in the greater, hegemonic literary world can be both necessary and a self-betrayal. I will respond to other writers’ words on these thems and incorporate the plurality of voices through interview/events with other writers in the community, particularly in my community of Los Angeles which includes such writers as Brian Kim Stefans, Ara Shirinyan, Margaret Rhee, Jen Hofer, Sesshu Foster, and many others whose conversation makes up some of the backdrop to this piece. My piece will thus represent not only my own inadequacy of words, to paraphrase Coleman, confronted with the suffocating inadequacy of the racial imaginary, but also a slice of the “urban actuality” that exists right now, in this enormous cacophony on the edge of the continent. It is a hybrid form, part performance, part reading, part lecture, personal and also inclusive like this hybrid identity that threatens always to emerge from under the seamless face of a cultural or racial label.

Speakers
avatar for Geneva Chao

Geneva Chao

Geneva Chao has recently proposed the torus (a surface of revolution in continual motion around its coplanar axis) as a metaphor for the Asian American writing community. This happened at the California Institute for Integral Studies’ Conference “From Trauma to Catharsis: Performing... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC 330

11:00am

Fracturations: Meditations on the Politics and Poetics of Intersectionality

Reflecting on experiences of feminists of color in academia, this panel explores the politics and poetics of intersectionality in identity (re)formations fractured through innovative texts.  Its participants will speak in tongues of split consciousness, polyphonic voices, and “fracturations,” i.e. fractured social liminalities and / or fracturing of institutional power and privilege via resistance.  The panel may include readings of microessays, experimental poetry, or hybrid media projects.

As I contemplated the intersections of creativity and identity politics in academia, the concept for “Fracturations” germinated in response to invitations by dominant culture members to speak about my experiences as “an Asian female professor.” Of course, my issues with the question itself -- in the contexts presented, i.e. positions of institutional and racial or gender privilege vs. my token "otherness" -- were multifarious.  I leave it up to the audience and panelists to fill in the blanks with your own avocations, your own agency to name yourselves and present your identities and avocations to the world through innovative texts that cross boundaries – not only within academia but outside it, as well.

 


Moderators
avatar for Karen An-hwei Lee

Karen An-hwei Lee

Full Professor of English & Chair, Vanguard University of So. California
Karen An-hwei Lee holds an M.F.A. from Brown University and Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Phyla of Joy (Tupelo 2012), Ardor (Tupelo 2008) and In Medias Res (Sarabande 2004), winner of the Norma Farber First Book Award. Lee also... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Bhanu Jacasta Kapil

Bhanu Jacasta Kapil

Writer-teacher, Naropa University
"Tell us about yourself": Foreign/Normal. | | "Passions": Buddhist meditation/ Hanuman; teaching through clay, theory and physical experiments of different kinds; linking up, every day, to the great streaming that carries others to their destinations.
avatar for Ruth Ellen Kocher

Ruth Ellen Kocher

Associate Professor, Associate Chair, Director of Creative Writing, University of Colorado
Ruth Ellen Kocher is the author of the Ending in Planes (Noemi, 2014), Goodbye Lyric: The Gigans and Lovely Gun (Sheep Meadow Press 2014), domina Un/blued (Tupelo Press 2012), and also One Girl Babylon (New Issues Press 2003), When the Moon Knows You’re Wandering, Winner of the... Read More →
avatar for Karen An-hwei Lee

Karen An-hwei Lee

Full Professor of English & Chair, Vanguard University of So. California
Karen An-hwei Lee holds an M.F.A. from Brown University and Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Phyla of Joy (Tupelo 2012), Ardor (Tupelo 2008) and In Medias Res (Sarabande 2004), winner of the Norma Farber First Book Award. Lee also... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
UC 331

11:00am

Film, Narrativity, and Oral Histories

A panel exploring the intersections, challenges, and realities in narrative realism and in storytelling through oral histories, filmmaking, and documentary film, in particular. Screening of excerpted films by Lorna Lowe and Brooke Swaney. Katie Kane will be discussing oral histories gathered in Haiti for the Voices of Witness Project (McSweeney's). David Witzling will moderate.


Moderators
DW

David Witzling

Associate Professor, English, Manhattan College
I am Associate Professor of English at Manhattan College, where I teach American Literature, African-American literature, and literary theory. I am the author of Everybody’s America: Thomas Pynchon, Race, and the Cultures of Postmodernism (Routledge, 2008). My ongoing research project... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Katie Kane

Katie Kane

Associate Professor, University of Montana
Katie Kane is a professor of Cultural Studies, English Literature, and Colonial Studies at the University of Montana. The author of a study on the links between Ireland and Indian Country as they emerge out of a shard history of land appropriation and the use of reserved land, Kane... Read More →
avatar for Lorna Lowe

Lorna Lowe

Producer, Lorna Lowe|Documentary Films, Inc.
avatar for Brooke Swaney

Brooke Swaney

Brooke Pepion Swaney (Amskapipiikuni, Selish descendent) is a film director and writer, who received her M.F.A. in Film and Television from Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. Swaney is a 2014 NACF Film Fellow, a 2013 Time Warner Fellow, a 2012 Sundance Institute Native... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
UC Theatre UC

11:00am

Allies and Race

Jess Row

David Greenberg

Ailish Hopper

Joy Katz


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for David Micah Greenberg

David Micah Greenberg

The author of Planned Solstice (Iowa), David Micah Greenberg’s poems have appeared in The New Republic, Ploughshares, Colorado Review, and other publications, and have received awards from NEH and the American Academy of Poets. A former organizer with homeless men and women and... Read More →
avatar for Ailish Hopper

Ailish Hopper

I'm the author of Dark~Sky Society (New Issues, 2014), and the chapbook, Bird in the Head (Center for Book Arts, 2005). The narrative I'm presenting at TIP in 2017 is from a book of essays (some drawings, some documentation of collaborations in Baltimore), "Vanish into Form," that... Read More →
avatar for Joy Katz

Joy Katz

Joy Katz's third collection of poems, All You Do is Perceive (Four Way Books), was named one of the best books of 2013 by the Kansas City Star. Her honors include a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, a Wallace Stegner fellowship, a Pushcart prize, and a 2014 Professional... Read More →
avatar for Jess Row

Jess Row

Jess Row is the author of the novel Your Face in Mine (2014) and two collections of short stories, Nobody Ever Gets Lost (2011) and The Train to Lo Wu (2005). His fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Granta, Tin House, and many other venues, and he's a frequent contributor... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
Shakespeare & Co.

3:45pm

Amiri Baraka: Responding to an SOS: A Conversation with Paul Vangelisti
Moderators
avatar for Randall Horton

Randall Horton

Randall Horton is the recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award, the Bea González Poetry Award and most recently a National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship in Literature. Randall is a Cave Canem Fellow and a member of the Affrilachian Poets. Triquarterly/Northwestern University... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

San Houston State University
Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart's Traffic (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017; winner of the 2018 Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Poetry).They are a Kundiman, Lambda and Callaloo Fellow and a member of the Macondo and Voices of Our... Read More →
avatar for Randall Horton

Randall Horton

Randall Horton is the recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award, the Bea González Poetry Award and most recently a National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship in Literature. Randall is a Cave Canem Fellow and a member of the Affrilachian Poets. Triquarterly/Northwestern University... Read More →
EP

Ed Pavlic

Professor of English and Creative Writing, ED PAVLIĆ’S newest books are Let's Let | That Are Not Yet : Inferno (National Poetry Series, Fence Books, 2015), Visiting Hours at the  | Color Line (National Poetry Series, Milkweed Editions, 2013), But Here Are Small Clear  | Refractions... Read More →
avatar for Metta Sáma

Metta Sáma

I live in North Carolina & originally am from Tennessee. I have mostly lived in the Midwest & Northeast for the past 15 years; this return to the South is mind-boggling, particularly talking about race & history in the South that would like to forget its history (in theory) but do... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
UC 333

3:45pm

Racial Imaginary Reading

Claudia Rankine

Beth Loffreda

(Sandra Lim, Jess Row, Bhanu Kapil et al. several more writers + ten)


Moderators
BL

Beth Loffreda

Beth Loffreda is a nonfiction writer and the author of Losing Matt Shepard: Life and Politics in the Aftermath of Anti-Gay Murder and, with Claudia Rankine and Max King Cap, The Racial Imaginary. She teaches creative writing and American Studies at the University of Wyoming, where... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Bhanu Jacasta Kapil

Bhanu Jacasta Kapil

Writer-teacher, Naropa University
"Tell us about yourself": Foreign/Normal. | | "Passions": Buddhist meditation/ Hanuman; teaching through clay, theory and physical experiments of different kinds; linking up, every day, to the great streaming that carries others to their destinations.
avatar for Sandra Lim

Sandra Lim

Assistant Professor of English, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
Sandra Lim is the author of two collections of poetry, Loveliest Grotesque (Kore Press, 2006) and The Wilderness (W.W. Norton, 2014), winner of the 2013 Barnard Women Poets Prize, selected by Louise Glück. Her work is also included in the anthology Gurlesque (Saturnalia, 2010). She... Read More →
BL

Beth Loffreda

Beth Loffreda is a nonfiction writer and the author of Losing Matt Shepard: Life and Politics in the Aftermath of Anti-Gay Murder and, with Claudia Rankine and Max King Cap, The Racial Imaginary. She teaches creative writing and American Studies at the University of Wyoming, where... Read More →
avatar for Farid Matuk

Farid Matuk

Assistant Professor, English and Creative Writing, University of Arizona
Farid Matuk is the author of This Isa Nice Neighborhood (Letter Machine, 2010) and My Daughter La Chola (Ahsahta, 2013). New poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in Poetry, Boundary2, Floor, and Best American Experimental Poetry 2014. The Headlands Center for the Arts... Read More →
avatar for Jess Row

Jess Row

Jess Row is the author of the novel Your Face in Mine (2014) and two collections of short stories, Nobody Ever Gets Lost (2011) and The Train to Lo Wu (2005). His fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Granta, Tin House, and many other venues, and he's a frequent contributor... Read More →
RW

Ronaldo Wilson

RONALDO WILSON, PhD, is the author of Narrative of the Life of the Brown Boy and the White Man (University of | Pittsburgh Press, 2008), winner of the 2007 Cave Canem Poetry Prize; Poems of the Black Object (Futurepoem | Books, 2009) winner of the 2010 Asian American Literary Award... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
UC Theatre UC

3:45pm

Borders and Tongues: How Translation Fractals Race

Borders and Tongues: How Translation Fractals Race

How does our understanding and experience of race factor into the decisions we make as translators? How do culturally specific ideas about race exponentially complicate the cross-cultural and cross-language interactions and interventions translation entails?

And how does translation (as a reading practice or a creative practice) fractal our thinking about race, usefully undermining the comfortable or uncomfortable categories that are constructed by cultures, pedagogies, histories? How are our ideas about race changed in the intimate process of writing from inside another person’s language, of thinking from inside the architecture of another person’s syntax?

 

This hybrid panel/reading—comprised of Jen Hofer (moderator and presenter, representing the language justice and language experimentation collective Antena), John Keene, and James Thomas Stevens—explores the interactions and intersections of translation and race. We are interested in thinking about how race informs the work we do as translators, both in terms of our aesthetic and political approach to the practice, and in terms of questions of audience, reception, the relationship between departing and arriving languages, who we choose to translate, and the wide array of complexities that occur in the transposition of context that translation entails.

Each of us will present briefly on questions most central to our own thinking about the complex multi-directional inflections of race and translation, referencing specific work we've translated or ideas around translation that are present in our creative work. Then, each of us will give a brief reading/performance that reflects the work or ideas referenced in our presentations. We intend to activate both theory and practice, and to leave ample time for questions and conversation, as this is a topic that is rarely discussed and we are eager to hear impressions from other colleagues.

 


Moderators
avatar for Jen Hofer

Jen Hofer

Antena
Jen Hofer is a Los Angeles-based poet, translator, social justice interpreter, teacher, knitter, book-maker, public letter-writer, urban cyclist, and co-founder of the language justice and literary activism collaborative Antena. Her latest translations include the chapbook En las... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jen Hofer

Jen Hofer

Antena
Jen Hofer is a Los Angeles-based poet, translator, social justice interpreter, teacher, knitter, book-maker, public letter-writer, urban cyclist, and co-founder of the language justice and literary activism collaborative Antena. Her latest translations include the chapbook En las... Read More →
avatar for John Keene

John Keene

Associate Professor, Rutgers University at Newark
John Keene is the author of the poetic novel Annotations (New Directions, 1995); of the poetry collection Seismosis (1913 Press), with artist Christopher Stackhouse; and of the short fiction collection Counternarratives (New Directions, 2015) . He also is the translator of Brazilian... Read More →
JT

James Thomas Stevens

James Thomas Stevens, Aronhió:ta’s, (Akwesasne Mohawk) attended the Institute of American Indian Arts, Naropa University's Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, and Brown University’s graduate C.W. program. Stevens is the author of eight books of poetry, including, Combing... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
UC 331

7:00pm

Literary Reading: Marilyn Chin, Sarah Shun-Lien Bynum, and Ofelia Zepeda

Marilyn Chin

Ofelia Zepeda

Sarah Shun-Lien Bynum


Moderators
avatar for Max Kaisler

Max Kaisler

Second-year MFA student in poetry at UM, graduating this May.
KS

Kathryn Shanley

Professor, University of Montana
Kathryn Shanley teaches in Native American Studies at the University of Montana and serves as Special Assistant to the Provost for Native American and Indigenous Education. She earned an MA (Diaspora Literature) and a Ph.D. in English with a specialization in Native American literature... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Shun-lien Bynum

Sarah Shun-lien Bynum

Sarah Shun-lien Bynum is the author of two novels, Ms. Hempel Chronicles, a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award, and Madeleine Is Sleeping, a finalist for the 2004 National Book Award and winner of the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize. Her fiction has appeared in many magazines and... Read More →
MC

Marilyn Chin

Marilyn Chin was born in Hong Kong and raised in Portland, Oregon.   Her books have become Asian American classics and are taught in classrooms internationally. Marilyn Chin’s books of poems include   HARD LOVE PROVINCE, RHAPSODY IN PLAIN YELLOW, DWARF BAMBOO, and THE PHOENIX... Read More →
OZ

Ofelia Zepeda

A member of the Tohono O’odham (formerly Papago) Nation, Ofelia Zepeda grew up in Stanfield, Arizona. She earned an MA and a PhD in linguistics from the University of Arizona and is the author of a grammar of the Tohono O'odham language, A Papago Grammar (1983). Zepeda’s poetry... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 7:00pm - 8:15pm
UC Theatre UC

9:00pm

Baraka Tribute: Reading and Jazz Performance

In the tradition of a signifying, fisted head-nod protest groove comes "HEROES ARE GANG LEADERS," a group of poets and musicians formed by poet Thomas Sayers Ellis and his frequent collaborator Saxophonist James Brandon Lewis after the death of legendary poet/activist Amiri Baraka (2014) to resurrect the matrimony of Black Literary Art and Music as medicine, battle cry, dirge, and the struggle for pleasure.

Janice Lowe (Piano/Voice)
James Brandon Lewis (Saxophone)
Luke Stewart (Bass)
Ailish Hopper (Poet)
Randall Horton (Poet)
Margaret Morris (Voice)
Ryan Frazier (Trumpet)
Thomas Sayers Ellis (Head Hegro-in-Charge)

 Bios

Thomas Sayers Ellis is the author of The Maverick Room (Graywolf 2005) and Skin, Inc: Identify Repair Poem (Graywolf 2010). His poems and photographs have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies, including The Nation, Poetry, Paris Review, Tin House, Transition and Best American Poetry (1997, 2001, 2010 and 2015). He is currently a Visiting Writer at the University of Montana.

James Brandon Lewis is a saxophonist and composer earning a Bachelors from Howard University, and Master of Fine arts degree from California Institute of the Arts. Ebony Magazine hailed james as one of seven jazz musicians to watch in today's scene. His second Album "Divine Travels " was released by historic imprint Okeh records via Sony and features William Parker, Gerald Cleaver, and TSE.

Ailish Hopper is the author of Dark~Sky Society (2014), selected by David St. John as runner up for the New Issues prize, and the chapbook Bird in the Head (2005), selected by Jean Valentine for the Center for Book Arts Prize. Individual poems have appeared in Agni, APR, Blackbird, Harvard Review Online, Ploughshares, Poetry, Tidal Basin Review, and other places. Her essays on art and literature that deal with race have appeared in or are forthcoming in Boston Review, Pilot Light, The Volta, and the anthology, A Sense of Regard: Essays on Poetry and Race. She's received support from the MacDowell Colony, Maryland State Arts Council, and Yaddo, and teaches at Goucher College.

Multi-instrumentalist Luke Stewart is “One of the hardest working Creative Musicians in DC.” - Twins Jazz. Luke has performed with the legendary saxophonist Marshall Allen with Danny Ray Thompson, both seminal members of Sun Ra’s Arkestra. He also performed with notable creative jazz musicians Ernest Dawkins, Lewis Barnes, Joseph Bowie, and Adam Rudolph. Other notable collaborations include performances with David Ornette Cherry, Ras Moshe, Khan Jamal, Jason Kao Hwang, James Brandon Lewis, Tom Zlabinger, William Parker, Elliott Levin, Abiodun Oyewale of the Last Poets, Tatsuya Nakatani, Daniel Carter, William Hooker, Anthony Pirog, Susan Alcorn, Federico Ughi, Max Johnson, and Bill Cole. His regular ensembles include Trio OOO with drummer Sam Lohman, and legendary DC Free Jazz saxophonist Aaron Martin. He is a founder of Union Arts DC, a collective space for artists in Washington, DC, and regularly presents challenging performances of Jazz and Avant Garde music through CapitalBop and his own “Creative Music” series.

Margaret Morris is a vocalist and improvisor who integrates her backgrounds in classical operatic and extended vocal techniques. She is a longtime collaborator with Chicago based choreographer J’Sun Howard. In 2013 she co-founded NYC based women’s choral and improvisation a capella ensemble LushTongue with Onome. Onome and Margaret performed under the moniker Inner Child, a collaborative, multi-disciplinary performance trio with Keisha Turner at Chicago and NYC venues including Links Hall and Wow Cafe Theater. Margaret was featured in The Exponential experimental album Encuentro with Ben Perkins and Brian Murray with whom she performed throughout 2011-2012. Margaret worked as a choreographer in Chicago where she was honored to be a Chicago Dancemakers Forum LAb Artist, a Link-Up resident artist with Links Hall, and collaborate with local dance artists including Asimina Chremos, Ni'ja Whitson, Angela Gronroos, Ayako Kato, and Erika Wilson Perkins. Her practices of contact improvisation and authentic movement continue to inform her work.

Randall Horton is the recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award, the Bea González Poetry Award and most recently a National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship in Literature. Randall is a Cave Canem Fellow and a member of the Affrilachian Poets. Triquarterly/Northwestern University Press in the publisher of his latest poetry collection Pitch Dark Anarchy. Randall is Assistant Professor of English at the University of New Haven.

Janice Lowe is a New York City-based composer and poet. Her works for musical theatre include Langston & Zora, text by Charles Drew (Wild Project,) Lil Budda, text by Stephanie L. Jones and Sit-In at the Five & Dime, text by Marjorie Duffield (New Harmony Project.) Lil Budda received a developmental residency from the Eugene O’Neil Musical Theater Conference and was shown at the National Alliance for Musical Theater's Festival of New Musicals with Anika Noni Rose and Anika Larson in lead roles. She is composer and librettist of the opera Dusky Alice. She has created original music for plays including 12th and Clairmont by Jenni Lamb and Door of No Return by Nehassaiu deGannes. She is librettist of Little Bird Loose, a song cycle collaboration with composer Nils Olaf Dolven. Her music-text collaborations have been performed at numerous venues including La Mama, Etc., Irondale Arts, Ars Nova, College of Staten Island, Ohio Theater, The Duplex, Dixon Place, Barrington Stage, MOCADA Museum, House of Tribes, Vineyard Theater, Stage Left Chicago and Case Western Reserve University. She was a recipient of a Dramatists Guild Jonathan Larson Fellowship. Her poems have been published in journals including Callaloo, The Hat and American Poetry Review. She has taught poetry writing and songwriting workshops in schools and community programs in New York City and Cleveland. She holds an MFA from New York University and is a co-founder of the Dark Room Collective.

Ryan T. Frazier is a musician, writer, and physicist based in Philadelphia. As a musician, he has been a contributor to Philadelphia's free jazz and afro-futurist punk scenes for almost a decade. He has performed or recorded with a wide range of musicians and artists, from the underground hiphop/punk band Mighty Paradocs, to renowned poets Sonia Sanchez and Thomas Sayers Ellis, and principle free jazz bassist William Parker. With his own band, Napoleon Dolomite, his musical approach is built from the mathematics of Thelonious Monk and Eric Dolphy, along with those of Wu Tang Clan and MF Doom, set in a rhythmic and free cosmic sound vision. Studying music and jazz culture/tradition with the great Donald Byrd as a teenager, he is currently an apprentice in the Sun Ra Arkestra, studying under its legendary director, Marshall Allen. Having studied African and African American literature at Hampton University, his current research focuses on the energy dynamics of human culture, using language and the culture of bebop to build a model of the cosmos, its function, composition, and origin. He has taught music at Oakland Public Conservatory of Music, in Oakland, CA, as well as in Philadelphia correctional institutions.


Tickets are sold through MAM (for the single event) or through registration for the conference via Thinking Its Presence Conference: http://cas.umt.edu/tip/raceandcreativewriting/


Moderators
TS

Thomas Sayers Ellis

Thomas Sayers Ellis is the author of two poetry collections, Skin, Inc. and The Maverick Room, which won the John C. Zacharis First Book Award. His poems and photographs have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies, including Callaloo, Best American Poetry (1997, 2001... Read More →

Speakers
TS

Thomas Sayers Ellis

Thomas Sayers Ellis is the author of two poetry collections, Skin, Inc. and The Maverick Room, which won the John C. Zacharis First Book Award. His poems and photographs have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies, including Callaloo, Best American Poetry (1997, 2001... Read More →
RF

Ryan Frazier

Ryan T. Frazier is a musician, writer, and physicist based in Philadelphia. As a musician, he has been a contributor to Philadelphia's free jazz and afro-futurist punk scenes for almost a decade. He has performed or recorded with a wide range of musicians and artists, from the underground... Read More →
avatar for Ailish Hopper

Ailish Hopper

I'm the author of Dark~Sky Society (New Issues, 2014), and the chapbook, Bird in the Head (Center for Book Arts, 2005). The narrative I'm presenting at TIP in 2017 is from a book of essays (some drawings, some documentation of collaborations in Baltimore), "Vanish into Form," that... Read More →
avatar for Randall Horton

Randall Horton

Randall Horton is the recipient of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Award, the Bea González Poetry Award and most recently a National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship in Literature. Randall is a Cave Canem Fellow and a member of the Affrilachian Poets. Triquarterly/Northwestern University... Read More →
JB

James Brandon Lewis

James Brandon Lewis is a saxophonist and composer earning a Bachelors from Howard University, and Master of Fine arts degree from California Institute of the Arts. Ebony Magazine hailed james as one of seven jazz musicians to watch in today's scene. His second Album "Divine Travels... Read More →
JL

Janice Lowe

Janice Lowe is a New York City-based composer and poet. Her works for musical theatre include Langston & Zora, text by Charles Drew (Wild Project,) Lil Budda, text by Stephanie L. Jones and Sit-In at the Five & Dime, text by Marjorie Duffield (New Harmony Project.) Lil Budda received... Read More →
MM

Margaret Morris

Margaret Morris is a vocalist and improvisor who integrates her backgrounds in classical operatic and extended vocal techniques. She is a longtime collaborator with Chicago based choreographer J’Sun Howard. In 2013 she co-founded NYC based women’s choral and improvisation a capella... Read More →
LS

Luke Stewart

Multi-instrumentalist Luke Stewart is “One of the hardest working Creative Musicians in DC.” - Twins Jazz. Luke has performed with the legendary saxophonist Marshall Allen with Danny Ray Thompson, both seminal members of Sun Ra’s Arkestra. He also performed with notable creative... Read More →


Friday March 13, 2015 9:00pm - 10:30pm
MAM
 
Saturday, March 14
 

9:00am

In Response to: "Are We Adequately Imagining Race and Culture?"

Ailish Hopper:  "Impossible Beings: Poetry, Time-Travel, and the Death of White Supremacy."

Benedicte Boisseron:  “'Bad Dog!' Race and Dogs from the Plantation to Michael Vick”

Ruth Vanita: “Precolonial Modernity in India: The Example of Cosmopolitan Lucknow"

Vanessa Place: "Playing Divya Victor’s Race Card"

 


Moderators
avatar for Alicia Bones

Alicia Bones

Here's a short bio: Alicia Bones is a second-year fiction student at the University of Montana. Previously, she earned her master’s degree in literature from the University of Iowa. Her work has been published in Spry, Hello Horror, Plain Song Review and elsewhere.

Speakers
BB

Benedicte Boisseron

The University of Montana
Bio: Bénédicte Boisseron is Associate Professor of French and Francophone Studies at The University of Montana. She received a Ph.D. in French from the University of Michigan (2006) and an M.A. in English from Paris 7, Université Paris Diderot. She has published various articles... Read More →
avatar for Ailish Hopper

Ailish Hopper

I'm the author of Dark~Sky Society (New Issues, 2014), and the chapbook, Bird in the Head (Center for Book Arts, 2005). The narrative I'm presenting at TIP in 2017 is from a book of essays (some drawings, some documentation of collaborations in Baltimore), "Vanish into Form," that... Read More →
avatar for Vanessa Place

Vanessa Place

CEO, VanessaPlaceInc
avatar for Ruth Vanita

Ruth Vanita

Ruth Vanita was educated at Delhi University where she taught for many years. She was founding co-editor of Manushi, India's first nationwide feminist magazine, from 1978 to 1990.  She co-edited the path-breaking Same-Sex Love in India: A Literary History, and is the author of... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC Theatre UC

9:00am

Why KA? FP

Title: Why KA? FP

Description:

The panelists will read representative samples of poetry by contemporary Korean American female poets and open the forum by saying something startling and potentially offensive. The panelists will then discuss issues including the function of old tales then and now, where they saw themselves in the literature as child writers, how to write good poems, I, and ignoring the ignorable. 

Statement of Merit:

This panel concerns the growing body of literature by Korean American female poets. All of a sudden, we’re everywhere. Today, for example, Poetry magazine sent one of us a check for $500 for the Frederick Bock Prize, though it was intended for Frances Choi, who may be another Korean American female poet. In spite of our growing visibility, there have been very few literary conference panels devoted to this topic, perhaps none. We believe we can start a thoughtful conversation, which we will generously open up to the audience. 

 


Moderators
avatar for Anna Maria Hong

Anna Maria Hong

Visiting Creative Writer, Ursinus College
Anna Maria Hong is the Visiting Creative Writer at Ursinus College and was the 2010-11 Bunting Fellow in Poetry at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. The recipient of Poetry magazine’s 2013 Frederick Bock Prize, she has poems recently published and forthcoming in publications... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Franny Choi

Franny Choi

Dark Noise Collective
Franny Choi is the author of the collection Floating, Brilliant, Gone (Write Bloody Publishing, 2014) and the chapbook Death by Sex Machine (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2017). She has received awards and fellowships from the Poetry Foundation, Kundiman, and the Rhode Island State Council... Read More →
avatar for Anna Maria Hong

Anna Maria Hong

Visiting Creative Writer, Ursinus College
Anna Maria Hong is the Visiting Creative Writer at Ursinus College and was the 2010-11 Bunting Fellow in Poetry at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. The recipient of Poetry magazine’s 2013 Frederick Bock Prize, she has poems recently published and forthcoming in publications... Read More →
avatar for Youna Kwak

Youna Kwak

Youna Kwak was born in Seoul, Korea. She now teaches and writes in Southern California.
HP

Hannah Park

Hannah Sanghee Park is the author of  The Same-Different, winner of the 2014 Walt Whitman Award from The Academy of the American Poets (forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press in April 2015). She holds an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a BA from the University... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC 330

9:00am

The Personal Essay
Anita Huslin
Charlene Choi
Amanda Fortini
Carmen Giménez Smith

Speakers
CC

Charlene Choi

Charlene Charlene Choi is a Canadian writer, selected by the National Arts Club and the Page Series as one of New York City’s Best Emerging Writers.  She has studied Poetry at the University of Iowa’s Writers Workshop Graduate Summer Program and Fiction at the New School’s... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Fortini

Amanda Fortini

Amanda Fortini has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, the New Republic, New York Magazine, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Wired, Slate and Salon, among other publications. She is currently a contributing editor at Elle Magazine, and has been the William... Read More →
avatar for Anita Huslin

Anita Huslin

Anita Rivera Huslin is an award-winning editor, reporter and writer at such news organizations as NPR, The New York Times and The Washington Post, where she was a Pulitzer Prize finalist and wrote, among other subjects, about the intersection of business and the economy and minority... Read More →
avatar for Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith

Carmen Giménez Smith recently co-edited the anthology Angels of the Americplyse: New Latin@ Writing (Counterpath, 2014). Her most recent poetry collection, Milk and Filth was a finalist for the NBCC. A CantoMundo Fellow, she is the publisher of Noemi Press. Her newest collection... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC 332

9:00am

University of Montana MFA Student and Alumni Literary Reading
University of Montana Graduate Creative Writing Program

Moderators
avatar for Max Kaisler

Max Kaisler

Second-year MFA student in poetry at UM, graduating this May.

Speakers
avatar for Sierra Jacob

Sierra Jacob

Creative Writing MFA, University of Montana
As a third generation Indo, born and raised in Hawai`i, my maternal ancestors and I have learned to navigate colonized spaces. My poetry aspires to study the tools and effects of colonialism in Indonesia and Hawai`i, by specifically looking at how we exotify people and place... Read More →
avatar for Ari Laurel

Ari Laurel

Tech Workers Coalition
avatar for Tamara Love

Tamara Love

Tamara Love hails from Flint Michigan. After living and working in New York City for nearly ten years, she stumbled upon Debra Magpie Earling's book, Perma Red and managed to get into the University of Montana's Creative Writing Program. She is an adjunct for the University of Montana... Read More →
avatar for Rosemary Madero

Rosemary Madero

I'm a grad student in the creative writing program at the University of Montana. Memoir is my thing and currently writing an essay about the MFA experience from the perspective of someone not exactly in the age demographic: "Grandma Goes to Grad School."
avatar for Asta So

Asta So

Asta So was born in Hong Kong and grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she studied English literature and creative writing at Stanford University. She writes both fiction and nonfiction and received her MFA in creative writing from the University of Montana.
avatar for Lehua Taitano

Lehua Taitano

Lehua M. Taitano, a native Chamoru from Yigo, Guåhan (Guam), is a queer writer and interdisciplinary artist. She is the author of A Bell Made of Stones (poems, TinFish Press) a chapbook of short fiction, appalachiapacific, winner of the 2010 Merriam-Frontier Award, and a chapbook... Read More →
avatar for Diana Xin

Diana Xin

Adjunct Instructor, South Seattle College
I completed my MFA in fiction at the University of Montana in 2014. My work has appeared or is forthcoming in Alaska Quarterly Review, The Masters Review, American Chordata and Gulf Coast. I am interested in strategies for talking meaningfully about race in diverse urban settings... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
Shakespeare & Co.

9:00am

Two Friends Talk About Personal History, Race, Poet Imagining, and Cosmology

The merit proposed in this conversation comes from the sense that the racial imaginary differs in every individual, and it is our collective imaginaries that make up a more public imaginary of our time. In addition, our imaginaries are personal, as our imaginaries take our personal history (including our reading) and, in our public work, transform experience into poetry. Poetry is an act of faith in language and in person. In the case of these two writers, we witness a lifetime of experience touching on racial matters, and a lifetime of poetic exploration from and within this experience. If one finds merit in the primary works of these two poets, and in their honest exploration of their own experience and issues, and if one finds merit in the nature of poetic transformation, then merit will be found in this conversation.

In addition, these two friends are excited to embrace a new possibility for their relationship, as one black man from California and one white man now living in Texas, question themselves and each other. This is drama, live and unfettered. It invites your witness, and your participation.

The title of the conference is “THINKING ITS PRESENCE.” What we propose is the 
immediate presence of thinking about the primary issue of this conference, thinking 
through history, through poetry, and through poetics; thinking in real time.


Moderators
CH

Charles H. Alexander

Artist: Poet, Bookmaker, founder/director of Chax Press. Author of 5 full- length books of poetry and 10 brief chapbooks of poetry, editor of one critical work on the state of the book arts in America, author of multiple essays, articles, and reviews. Most recent book of poetry is... Read More →

Speakers
WA

Will Alexander

The historic/mythic sites of Charles Alexander’s work move from his youthful spaces of Central Oklahoma, to his long-time desert territory in Arizona, to the mythic places of Arthur and possible anoethenau (hidden valuable things that might be found once again).  Charles Alexander... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 9:00am - 10:50am
UC 331

11:00am

Doctoring the Syllabus: Racialized Narratives of "Professionalization" in Creative Writing PhD Curricula

This past year, a Junot Diaz article in The New Yorker ("MFA vs POC") and a subsequent NPR article ("In Elite MFA Programs, the Struggle of Writing While 'Other'") helped give new life to an ongoing conversation about race, representation, and access to the resources and opportunities the MFA often provides. The latter piece tracked the experiences of several Iowa Writers Workshop alumna from skeptical-acceptees-and-frustrated-students to successful-authors-and-now-faculty-at-their-alma-mater, expressing determination to change the program's racial landscape, from the bodies in the room to the undertones of career advice and workshop discussion. The piece did not, however, acknowledge the rise of the Creative Writing PhD as a prerequisite for such faculty positions, especially for job candidates of color, who are systematically required to be "twice as good to get half as much" in every professional field. In light of this--and foregrounding our agreement that it is imperative that student and faculty demographics in doctoral programs reflect the growing diversity of many higher education institutions--this panel specifically interrogates the curricular experience that attends the PhD's "professionalization" of writers for academic careers.

In other words: How, and to what degree, do doctoral course offerings support the writers of color that these programs claim to value? Furthermore: If doctoral programs that do recruit underrepresented students also require/offer courses that reinforce the notion of Eurocentric Whiteness as the voice and locus of literary authority, what implicit message does this send to writers of color about the market, field, and institutions that await them? This panel presents for discussion the results of a crowdsourced survey of more than 20 Creative Writing PhD programs' course syllabi, privileging the following qualitative and quantitative concerns:

 

  • Does the coursework reflect the need for competency when teaching not only diverse groups of students, but also diverse literatures?
  • How present are people of color in assigned texts? Do syllabi reflect a fairly typical tokenism when it comes to writers of color and/or texts that engage race and raced experiences?
  • If departments do not have the staffing to offer courses in more diverse literatures, how open are the programs of study to pursuit of these literatures in other departments?

We propose to look at the Fall 2014 semester in particular, a small but relevant sample size that is meant as a starting point for a broader, deeper, and more direct conversation with Creative Writing PhD programs than we’ve seen before.

 


Moderators
avatar for Adam Atkinson

Adam Atkinson

PhD student, Literature and Creative Writing; Graduate Instructor, Gender Studies, University of Utah

Speakers
SV

Sarah Vap

Sarah Vap is the author of five collections of poetry. The most recent are Arco Iris (Saturnalia Books), which was named a Library Journal Book Best Book of 2012 and End of the Sentimental Journey (Noemi Press, 2013). She is a recipient of a 2013 National Endowment of the Arts... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
UC 330

11:00am

On the Poetics of Anguish, Gender, and Variant Constructions

Event Description: On the Poetics of Anguish, Gender, and Variant Constructions

Can violence, the bifurcation/trifurcation of gender, and the line speak to impossibilities of saying and arrival? Is monstrosity’s fluidity and multiplicity contained in a poetry’s body? Do the pathways of grammar, our variant/queer/violent/diasporic sentences/lines/sounds–reflect the risks and failures of our experiments? In this conversation, Ching-In Chen, Bhanu Kapil, Soham Patel and Mg Roberts investigate gender and its constant relation to a non-resolution and to anguish by exploring the self’s push against structures of possibility, grammar, and the body itself. Moderator: Mg Roberts.

 


Moderators
SP

Soham Patel

Soham Patel is a Kundiman fellow. Two of her chapbooks, 'and nevermind the storm' (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs), and 'Riva: A Chapter' (kitchen-shy press) came out in 2013. Her work has been featured at Fact-Simile Editions, Copper Nickel, Denver Quarterly and various other... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

San Houston State University
Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart's Traffic (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017; winner of the 2018 Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Poetry).They are a Kundiman, Lambda and Callaloo Fellow and a member of the Macondo and Voices of Our... Read More →
avatar for Bhanu Jacasta Kapil

Bhanu Jacasta Kapil

Writer-teacher, Naropa University
"Tell us about yourself": Foreign/Normal. | | "Passions": Buddhist meditation/ Hanuman; teaching through clay, theory and physical experiments of different kinds; linking up, every day, to the great streaming that carries others to their destinations.
SP

Soham Patel

Soham Patel is a Kundiman fellow. Two of her chapbooks, 'and nevermind the storm' (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs), and 'Riva: A Chapter' (kitchen-shy press) came out in 2013. Her work has been featured at Fact-Simile Editions, Copper Nickel, Denver Quarterly and various other... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
UC Theatre UC

11:00am

Another Word for Giving Up: Thinking About Hope, Healing, and Justice in the Age of Irony
David Micah Greenberg will moderate a discussion with John Keene and Jess Row focusing on race, irony, and justice.

Moderators
avatar for David Micah Greenberg

David Micah Greenberg

The author of Planned Solstice (Iowa), David Micah Greenberg’s poems have appeared in The New Republic, Ploughshares, Colorado Review, and other publications, and have received awards from NEH and the American Academy of Poets. A former organizer with homeless men and women and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for John Keene

John Keene

Associate Professor, Rutgers University at Newark
John Keene is the author of the poetic novel Annotations (New Directions, 1995); of the poetry collection Seismosis (1913 Press), with artist Christopher Stackhouse; and of the short fiction collection Counternarratives (New Directions, 2015) . He also is the translator of Brazilian... Read More →
avatar for Jess Row

Jess Row

Jess Row is the author of the novel Your Face in Mine (2014) and two collections of short stories, Nobody Ever Gets Lost (2011) and The Train to Lo Wu (2005). His fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Granta, Tin House, and many other venues, and he's a frequent contributor... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
UC 333

11:00am

Literary Reading: Elissa Washuta & Erika T. Wurth
Elissa Washuta’s My Body is a Book of Rules and Erika T. Wurth’s Crazy Horse’s Girlfriend, are two Native texts that approach the idea of location and identity in radically different ways – but which ultimately speak to same sense of finding home. Wurth’s novel, which is in traditional narrative form and in first person, looks at location from the outside in; the novel is framed by the main character’s attempt to resist the place that forms her communal and familial location, but from which she ultimately can’t, and doesn’t want to, escape. Washuta’s memoir of essays about identity, sexuality and bi-polar disorder, also written (primarily) in first person but in a series of different forms, looks at location from the inside out, with the narrator looking for ways to connect with her home and her body, but ultimately finding that she must leave to do so. This panel will offer readings from both books, and a discussion on how form affects perceptions of identity and location in (these and other) Native texts.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Erika Wurth

Erika Wurth

Associate Professor of creative writing, fiction, Western Illinois University
Erika T. Wurth's novel, Crazy Horse's Girlfriend, was published by Curbside Splendor. Her collection of poetry, Indian Trains, was published by The University of New Mexico's West End Press. A writer of both fiction and poetry, she teaches creative writing at Western Illinois University... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
Shakespeare & Co.

11:00am

The Distraction of Reference: A Reading

A literary reading by Sandra Lim, Jennifer Tseng, and Solmaz Sharif.


Moderators
avatar for Sandra Lim

Sandra Lim

Assistant Professor of English, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
Sandra Lim is the author of two collections of poetry, Loveliest Grotesque (Kore Press, 2006) and The Wilderness (W.W. Norton, 2014), winner of the 2013 Barnard Women Poets Prize, selected by Louise Glück. Her work is also included in the anthology Gurlesque (Saturnalia, 2010). She... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sandra Lim

Sandra Lim

Assistant Professor of English, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
Sandra Lim is the author of two collections of poetry, Loveliest Grotesque (Kore Press, 2006) and The Wilderness (W.W. Norton, 2014), winner of the 2013 Barnard Women Poets Prize, selected by Louise Glück. Her work is also included in the anthology Gurlesque (Saturnalia, 2010). She... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Tseng

Jennifer Tseng

Jack Kerouac Writer in Residence, University of Massachusetts Lowell
Poet and fiction writer Jennifer Tseng was born in Indiana and raised in California by a Chinese immigrant engineer and a first generation German American microbiologist. Her first book The Man With My Face (AAWW 2005) won the 2005 Asian American Writers' Workshop's National Poetry... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 11:00am - 12:50pm
UC 332

3:45pm

Shifting Authenticities: Play in the Face of...

TITLE: Shifting Authenticities: Play in the Face Of…

“Life is to be lived, not controlled, and humanity is won by continuing to play in the face of 
certain defeat.” Ralph Ellison’s 1952 articulation of the structure (and psychology) of some 
aspects of the American racial imaginary is both comic and, though painful, fun. The novel’s 
absurdist humor is, in part, dependent on the irrational logic of the racial. We imagine the 
space for “fun” is won (or earned) largely through labor, through work. Work hard, play 
hard, the saying goes. What is the work of the racial imaginary? What are the forms of play 
that animate (and subvert) the (il)logic of the racial? 

This panel will combine critical inquiry, performances, and readings in considering the 
operative force of humor and serious play in the poetics of Amiri Baraka, Wanda Coleman, 
and American others. What is fun in the literary and performative? How do artists play 
around with shifting modalities of representation, authenticity, and authority? How are 
attempts to administer identity and meaning subverted and reconfigured in literature and 
performance? How do these writers (the writers being celebrated and the writers 
celebrating) engage in unadministered fun?

This panel will explore the indispensible nature of humor and fun in both navigating and 
subverting structures that operate to legislate identity and meaning. We will consider how 
literature and performance may resist ready categorizations, and how pleasure is activated 
even as one faces the serious and the deadly (without simple resort to the masochistic).


Moderators
TF

Tonya Foster

TONYA FOSTER is a poet and writer. Author of Swarms of Bees in High Court (forthcoming), she is a PhD candidate at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is completing her dissertation, Difficult Subjects: Talking  Sh*t at the Crossroads. A recipient of fellowships and grants from... Read More →

Speakers
TF

Tonya Foster

TONYA FOSTER is a poet and writer. Author of Swarms of Bees in High Court (forthcoming), she is a PhD candidate at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is completing her dissertation, Difficult Subjects: Talking  Sh*t at the Crossroads. A recipient of fellowships and grants from... Read More →
avatar for Erica Hunt

Erica Hunt

Parsons Family Professor of Creative Writing, Long Island University--Brooklyn
Erica Hunt is the author of Local History, Arcade, Piece Logic, A Day and Its Approximates, & Time Slips Right Before Your Eyes. With Dawn Lundy Martin, she co-edited the anthology Letters to the Future, Radical Writing by Black Women. Hunt is the Parsons Family Professor of Creative... Read More →
TM

Tracie Morris

TRACIE MORRIS is a poet who has worked extensively as a sound poet, bandleader, actor and multimedia performer. Her sound installations have been presented at the Whitney Biennial, MoMA, Ronald Feldman Gallery, The Silent Barn, The Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, The Drawing... Read More →
RW

Ronaldo Wilson

RONALDO WILSON, PhD, is the author of Narrative of the Life of the Brown Boy and the White Man (University of | Pittsburgh Press, 2008), winner of the 2007 Cave Canem Poetry Prize; Poems of the Black Object (Futurepoem | Books, 2009) winner of the 2010 Asian American Literary Award... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
UC 330

3:45pm

Chax Press Reading

A reading of poets published by Chax Press, ranging from publications in the 1980s to recent publications.


Moderators
CH

Charles H. Alexander

Artist: Poet, Bookmaker, founder/director of Chax Press. Author of 5 full- length books of poetry and 10 brief chapbooks of poetry, editor of one critical work on the state of the book arts in America, author of multiple essays, articles, and reviews. Most recent book of poetry is... Read More →

Speakers
CH

Charles H. Alexander

Artist: Poet, Bookmaker, founder/director of Chax Press. Author of 5 full- length books of poetry and 10 brief chapbooks of poetry, editor of one critical work on the state of the book arts in America, author of multiple essays, articles, and reviews. Most recent book of poetry is... Read More →
WA

Will Alexander

The historic/mythic sites of Charles Alexander’s work move from his youthful spaces of Central Oklahoma, to his long-time desert territory in Arizona, to the mythic places of Arthur and possible anoethenau (hidden valuable things that might be found once again).  Charles Alexander... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
UC Theatre UC

3:45pm

VONA Workshop reading

The VONA/Voices Writing Workshop, founded by Elmaz Abinader, Junot Díaz, Victor 
Díaz, and Diem Jones in 1999, is the only workshop in the U.S. dedicated to the 
aesthetics of writers of color. In 2014, Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela of Thread Makes 
Blanket Press published Dismantle: An Anthology of Writing from the VONA/Voices 
Writing Workshop. Dismantle brings together voices of writers of color from VONA 
workshops across the years, alumni and faculty. Join us as we read writing from the 
anthology, and as we talk about the important role of Thread Makes Blanket Press in 
publishing.

The first ever VONA/Voices anthology, Dismantle, includes creative work from 
established and new authors who have either taught at VONA, or are alumni of the 
program. In spring 2014 the New York Times re-published a version of Junot Díaz’s 
introduction in Dismantle in which he discusses his experience in his predominantly 
White MFA program. While many of us have been having conversations about the 
overwhelming Whiteness of MFA programs (faculty, students, curriculum), Díaz’s essay 
encouraged a larger conversation about the overall lack of racial and ethnic diversity in 
these programs. Dismantle’s importance in bringing together the voices of writers of 
color, and in highlighting the work of VONA/Voices of Our Nation and Thread Makes 
Blanket Press cannot be underestimated.


Moderators
RP

Rae Paris

Rae Paris is from Carson, California. Her work has been supported by the NEA, the Wurlitzer Foundation, the Hambidge Center, Atlantic Center for the Arts, Hedgebrook, and Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation (VONA). Her book The Forgetting Tree: A Rememory is forthcoming from Wayne... Read More →

Speakers
TB

Tara Betts

SUNY-Binghamton
Tara Betts (www.tarabetts.net) is the author of Arc & Hue and the libretto THE GREATEST!: A Tribute to Muhammad Ali. Tara recently received her Ph.D in English at SUNY-Binghamton University. Her work has appeared in Essence, Obsidian, HBO's Def Poetry Jam, and Jessica Care Moore's... Read More →
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

San Houston State University
Ching-In Chen is the author of The Heart's Traffic (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009) and recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017; winner of the 2018 Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Poetry).They are a Kundiman, Lambda and Callaloo Fellow and a member of the Macondo and Voices of Our... Read More →
avatar for Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela

Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela

and Thread Makes Blanket Press, Community College of Philadelphia
*Professor at the Community College of Philadelphia, which includes teaching college courses in Philadelphia jails and organizing to support undocumented students | *Founder of Thread Makes Blanket press which recently released Dismantle, the VONA anthology | *Fiction Editor at... Read More →
avatar for Kenji Liu

Kenji Liu

Poet, Essayist, Graphic Designer
Kenji C. Liu (劉謙司) is author of Map of an Onion, national winner of the 2015 Hillary Gravendyk Poetry Prize. His poetry is in American Poetry Review, Action Yes!, Split This Rock’s poem of the week series, several anthologies, and two chapbooks, Craters: A Field Guide (2017... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
UC 333

3:45pm

Western Writers

Ruth Vanita

Eduardo Chirinos

Paisley Rekdal

Farid Matuk

Bhanu Kapil

Jane Wong

Heather Cahoon


Moderators
avatar for Prageeta Sharma

Prageeta Sharma

Professor, The University of Montana
Prageeta Sharma is the author of four poetry collections, Bliss to Fill, The Opening Question, Infamous Landscapes, and Undergloom. Her writing has appeared in journals and anthologies such as Boston Review, Agni, Fence, The Women's Review of Books and (among others) The Harper Collins... Read More →

Speakers
EC

Eduardo Chirinos

Eduardo Chirinos (Lima, 1960) is the author of numerous books of poetry as well as volumes of academic criticism, essays, translations, children’s books, and occasional pieces. Chirinos is Professor of Spanish at the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures of... Read More →
avatar for Bhanu Jacasta Kapil

Bhanu Jacasta Kapil

Writer-teacher, Naropa University
"Tell us about yourself": Foreign/Normal. | | "Passions": Buddhist meditation/ Hanuman; teaching through clay, theory and physical experiments of different kinds; linking up, every day, to the great streaming that carries others to their destinations.
avatar for Farid Matuk

Farid Matuk

Assistant Professor, English and Creative Writing, University of Arizona
Farid Matuk is the author of This Isa Nice Neighborhood (Letter Machine, 2010) and My Daughter La Chola (Ahsahta, 2013). New poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in Poetry, Boundary2, Floor, and Best American Experimental Poetry 2014. The Headlands Center for the Arts... Read More →
avatar for Paisley Rekdal

Paisley Rekdal

University of Utah
avatar for Ruth Vanita

Ruth Vanita

Ruth Vanita was educated at Delhi University where she taught for many years. She was founding co-editor of Manushi, India's first nationwide feminist magazine, from 1978 to 1990.  She co-edited the path-breaking Same-Sex Love in India: A Literary History, and is the author of... Read More →
avatar for Jane Wong

Jane Wong

The University of Washington
Jane Wong's poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Best American Poetry 2015, Hayden's Ferry Review, Tupelo Quarterly, The Volta, CutBank, The Arcadia Project: North American Postmodern Pastoral, and Best New Poets 2012. The recipient of fellowships from the U.S. Fulbright Program... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 3:45pm - 5:00pm
UC 331

7:00pm

UM Welcome to Conference: Larry Abramson, Dean of Journalism; Introduction to Claudia Rankine: Joanna Klink; Claudia Rankine Talk and Reading
Larry Abramson, Dean of Journalism at the University of Montana 
Joanna Klink, Professor of English
Claudia Rankine, Keynote
 

Moderators
avatar for Joanna Klink

Joanna Klink

Joanna Klink is the author of four books of poetry: They Are Sleeping, Circadian, Raptus, and Excerpts from a Secret Prophecy (Penguin, 2015). She has received awards and fellowships from the Rona Jaffe Foundation, Jeannette Haien Ballard, Civitella Ranieri, and The American Academy... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Larry Abramson

Larry Abramson

Larry Abramson is the eighth dean in the 100-year history of the University of Montana School of Journalism. He moved to Missoula from Washington, D.C., where he spent three decades as a professional journalist, nearly all of them at National Public Radio. At NPR, Larry had a chance... Read More →
avatar for Joanna Klink

Joanna Klink

Joanna Klink is the author of four books of poetry: They Are Sleeping, Circadian, Raptus, and Excerpts from a Secret Prophecy (Penguin, 2015). She has received awards and fellowships from the Rona Jaffe Foundation, Jeannette Haien Ballard, Civitella Ranieri, and The American Academy... Read More →
CR

Claudia Rankine

Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including Citizen and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely, and the plays, Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue, commissioned by the Foundry Theatre and Existing Conditions (co-authored with Casey Llewellyn). Rankine is... Read More →


Saturday March 14, 2015 7:00pm - 8:15pm
UC Theatre UC

10:00pm

MFA Sponsored Dance Party--FOR ALL SPEAKERS AND ATTENDEES!
Please contact hotel shuttles and request that they bring you to the dance party. Also we will have designated drivers who are happy to drive you to and from the party. 

Saturday March 14, 2015 10:00pm - Sunday March 15, 2015 12:00am
ZACC